Art-to-Go with Lisa Leavell May 20 2020, 0 Comments

Sharing art with our community is what we are all about.  This is what inspired us to create our take-home art kits with Art-to-Go.

Each week while schools are closed and through the summer, we will put out new art kits. They will cover different materials, methods, and age groups. We will work up to having quick lessons in some of our kits. Some will have a video link for demonstrations. 

Photos, materials lists, and instructions will be made available for families who have lots of supplies at home and don't need to pick up the kits.  Use this link, https://www.bayschool-arts.com/  , to go to our website and then scroll down to find instructions for kits we have already distributed.  This list will be updated as we add more kits.

Have fun, be creative, and show us what you made! You can post pictures of your completed crafts on the Bay School Facebook page or email them to makeart@bayschool-arts.com. We will share them here!

We need some help to make this happen. We are paying our teaching artists to create the kits and our staff to keep them flowing to you. You can help out by donating here. Every little bit helps, and you have our thanks!!!

Lisa Leavell is one of our teaching artists that is creating some of these kits.  We asked Lisa a few questions about this program.

 

How different is art-to-go from teaching classes?  Art to go is a whole different animal for a variety of reasons. I am limited to the projects where I can gather all the supplies from the classroom and have to rely on the student having necessary supplies like glue, tape, markers etc that we are unable to send home in each kit. Writing directions in a manner in which the kids can understand the steps and directions to a project can also be very time consuming, something I do not have to consider when doing a class face to face with students. It has also been really different not being able to see the creative process as I can when I am teaching them on site. I am always amazed at the uniqueness of each individuals project given the same assignment they all put their creative flair into it and make it their own and that is a very rewarding part of teaching. 

How do you see this changing the way you teach in the future?  Honestly it truly is making me appreciate the time I have with them in class. You don't necessarily connect and bond with every student but the possibility is there and for me connection with the students is a huge part of teaching. My desire is not only to provide a time and space for them to be creative but to also get them thinking a bit deeper about the world around them and how they relate to it. I love the opportunity to have a positive and encouraging voice in their lives. 

Do you have any creative advice for those in quarantine?  My advice would be to expand your creativity and have a "use what you have" mindset. If we look around our homes, our yards and our neighborhoods we can find all sort of materials that we could use creatively. The more we use our creativity the more it continues to grow and unfold. I talk to people all the time that tell me "I don't have a creative bone in my body." To these folks I always say, "take one step and begin to do something creative and you will find an untapped well of creativity inside of you." We all have it. It doesn't all look the same, but it's there. The one thing that I have enjoyed thinking about while putting together these kits is families sitting around a table being creative together, we all need to pull away from the news, our phones and our work and take time to decompress and creativity is a powerful tool for that. 

My advice during this unprecedented time in our lives would be to encourage your kids in a journaling process and to begin one yourself. Even very young kids can start a picture journal about their feelings, about what they are grateful for, what might be making them sad, or happy, or afraid. It is a great time to get kids talking and sharing.